Oh look, people are starting to come back to reality regarding the Ouya

Dave Tach, for The Verge:

“It’s not going to ship,” Dent told Polygon. “It’s just not going to ship. It just costs too much to develop this. $4 million is nothing. They’ve got to pay fabrication. They’ve got to pay designers. They’ve got to pay manufacturers. They’ve got to market it. It’s a business. $4 million is nothing.”

Pretty damning, but pretty obvious. Even if they take in $10 million, we’re still not talking about much. Making a game with a couple hundred thousand dollars is definitely doable. Manufacturing a piece of hardware that’ll play high definition games at a tolerable frame rate? That’s a completely different story. But that’s not even the Ouya’s biggest problem. As Verge member ounkeo writes:

My thoughts exactly.. exactly how excited are develppers to be developing (and incurring cost) for a market that is only 40,000 units?

Personally, if it’s not pushing millions of units and install base, it’s a waste of time. Even assuming every single owner buys a game at (let’s say) $3 (because i really can’t see games selling for more than that here), your revenue is $120k minus 30% for the market means a good game would probably make 90k ish+

Getting a team to build anything remotely interesting will probably cost in the 60k (average) – $100k+++ range. Even assuming every person buys the game, which they won’t, you’re only breaking even, maybe making a very small profit if the game is relatively simple.

On a console that promises that every game will have a free-to-play aspect, developers won’t get out of bed for less than a hundred thousand potential users.

Just ReadWriteWeb link baiting about the Retina MacBook Pro

ReadWriteWeb:

Only Apple could get away with charging a $400 premium for a feature that no one needs, few people will notice, doesn’t work with most apps, and was not on anyone’s wish list until the company announced it last month.

Because God forbid Apple does something pushes the industry forward. I know plenty of photographers and web designers that wanted this for practical reasons. My girlfriend uses it to edit high definition video while still having plenty of screen real estate for her tools.

Would this article exist if HP had released a HiDPI laptop first?

The Brooks Review moving to paid business model

Ben Brooks:

Therefore, you can still enjoy this site, in full, without paying a dime or seeing a single ad — you just have to be OK with enjoying it seven days after members enjoy it.

I realize this isn’t ideal, but being as what I write is not time relevant, I feel that this is a decent tradeoff. If you aren’t a member you won’t be able to see what you are, in fact, missing — thus the content is indeed new to you when it does become “unlocked”. (This is the plan at least.)

Seems like an interesting experiment. I have my doubts that he’s going to be able to match his current ad revenue without regular posts asking readers to become members. As Marco Arment said yesterday:

As we discussed in yesterday’s podcast, advertisers are usually willing to pay much more than online audiences would be willing and able to pay themselves, and that’s why advertising is by far the most common method to fund media.

Penny Arcade is challenging their audience to make them a counterexample.

If they can pull it off, we might look back in a few years and see that these experiments by Penny Arcade and Ben Brooks were the beginning of the end of content producers using page views as the major measure of their success.

To Boos and Polite Applause, Romney Speaks to the N.A.A.C.P.

Ashley Parker, for the New York Times:

Less than four years after President Obama swept into the White House with the overwhelming support of the black community, Mitt Romney appeared on Wednesday before the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People with a bold claim: “If you want a president who will make things better in the African-American community, you are looking at him,” Mr. Romney said.
His assertion was met with cackles and boos – as well as some tepid applause – and was emblematic of his entire speech, in which he tried to appeal to the African-American community, while still offering some tough medicine and policy prescriptions unpopular with the group.

Romney’s going to have a tough time winning any of the black vote, considering his main draws for them are his opposition to same-sex marriage and the fact that his dad fought for civil rights.

Obama’s campaign can sweep the first to the side by making the link between opposition to same-sex marriage and interracial marriage. As for the second point, who cares what Romney’s father did 50 years ago?

British judge: Samsung tablets “not as cool” as Apple’s

Bloomberg:
The design for three Galaxy tablets doesn’t infringe Apple’s registered design, Judge Colin Birss said today in London in a court fight between the world’s two biggest makers of smartphones. Consumers aren’t likely to get the tablet computers mixed up, he said.

The Galaxy tablets “do not have the same understated and extreme simplicity which is possessed by the Apple design,” Birss said. “They are not as cool.”

While everyone is getting a good laugh out of this today, I can’t help but think that this is just further proof that intellectual property laws are in serious need of revamping.

That, or society has reached a point where government officials really can decide what is and isn’t “cool.”

Universal healthcare in Rwanda

A great article in the New York Times about the health care system in Rwanda that has boosted life expectancies by ten years, greatly increased the percentage of those with AIDS who receive treatment, and let doctors treat malaria before patients are near-death in a hospital.

Andrew Makaka, who manages the health financing unit at the Ministry of Health, said that only 4 percent of Rwandans are uninsured.

It’s sad that the United States can’t boast about covering as many of its citizens.

David Pogue reviews the Nexus 7

From his review:

If something smaller and lighter and far less expensive appeals to you, you’ll be thrilled by the Nexus 7, even if you have to wait awhile before you can find everything you want to read, watch and play on it.

Who buys a tablet knowing that it doesn’t offer the things they want to do with it?

I think that thousands of people are going to buy the Nexus 7 only to find themselves sorely disappointed with the app and content selection.

If you’re thinking about writing an article about the Nexus 7 and the iPad…

… and you’re thinking about saying something like, “The success of the Nexus 7 will force Apple to release a 7-inch iPad”, just stop right where you are. Reevaluate your life. Maybe writing about technology isn’t for you. Perhaps you should try being a lawyer or a politician, so that you can spout bullshit and still have some self-respect.

Seriously, when has any article about Apple being “forced” to do something because of a competitor’s product ever ended up being even partially right?

Chris Matyszczyk gives us an article about nothing…

… and not in the fun, Seinfeld kind of way.

His article for CNET about the psychology of the Facebook IPO is just one big mess. The rider:

What bliss. There is a psychological explanation for why Facebook investors chose to ignore the realities of the investment. It’s called “Availability bias.”

The final paragraph:

Might it be that the Facebook IPO disappointment wasn’t down to Availability Bias, but Sure Thing Syndrome?

Not only do the beginning and end of the post contradict each other, but the entire middle is just a stream of consciousness about businesses trying to copy the iPad. Or is it about investors thinking that by investing in Facebook, they’re somehow participating in it as a global phenomenon? Or that they thought that investing in it would automatically make them rich? 

I’m so confused.

 
 
 

Harry Marks on minimalist blogs

The entire thing is worth reading. My favorite quote:

As part of my new minimal philosophy I discovered on the Internet only hours ago, I’ve shunned spending money on frivolous things, so instead of a typical domain name, you’ll be able to find “M” at minimal.blogspot.angelfire.com/m-is-for-minimal.html. The URL is all about minimalism, so you won’t forget it.

Seriously, how do these people get anything done if they’re always blogging about how little they do?