Electric vehicle owners pay $1.14 for the equivalent of a gallon of gas

$1.14 a gallon gas? That’s the equivalent cost for electric vehicles:

A new statistic — the eGallon — will now be calculated monthly by the Department of Energy to gauge the price paid by electric vehicle drivers to go the same distance that a driver of a conventional car will travel, on average, using a gallon of gas.

People who own electric vehicles may already know what they’re paying to fill up, but the agency introduced the new “eGallon” metric to help consumers who are thinking about buying electric vehicles.

Based on the 2012 model year, the department’s analysis concluded that consumers are paying $1.14 a gallon nationally to drive 28.2 miles, the average distance traveled by comparable 2012 non-electric small and medium-size cars.

That $1.14 per eGallon compares with $3.65, the national average price for a gallon of regular unleaded gasoline.

With leases on electric cars approaching those of gasoline-powered vehicles, electric vehicles are coming ever closer to being the practical option for most drivers. The case is even stronger when you look at the the energy density of next-generation batteries – when electric cars can drive 1000 miles in one go, no one will complain about charging times,

New batteries put lithium-ion to shame, make electric cars far more practical

Nanomaterial Introduces Zinc-Air Batteries to the EV Party:

It seems both the commercial markets and the research community are coming to terms with the idea that the energy density (the amount of energy stored per unit volume) of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries will keep them from ever becoming a completely satisfactory solution to powering all-electric vehicles (EVs).

[…]

The hybrid nanomaterial was so good at this that in demonstrations the Stanford researchers were able to achieve an energy density of >700 Wh/kg with a prototype battery. To give you a sense of what that means, some have concluded that the Li-ion batteries—even with all the latest nanotech improvements—will be maxed out at around 400Wh/kg.

Zinc is also more plentiful than lithium in the earth’s crust (meaning zinc-air batteries should be cheaper) and unlike Li-ion, zinc-air cells doesn’t sometimes catch fire or explode.

Another win for electric vehicles.

Tesla has enough Model S preorders for a year’s worth of production

Quartz:

CEO and founder Elon Musk repeatedly pointed out that they could close down all their stores and have enough orders, including reservations for 15,000 Model S cars, to sell off a year’s worth of production. The company opened eight more stores around the US at the end of last year, bringing the total to 32, and will open 15 to 20 more, including a store in Beijing, this year. That makes Musk confident that sales will continue to increase in the US and around the world.

I’m excited to see what happens at Tesla over the next few years.

China and Beijing to offer $19,000 subsidy to buy electric cars

Chinese firm approved to buy U.S. electric car battery company | Marketplace.org:

“The central government gives electric car buyers a check worth $9,500. Last week, amidst a public outcry over hazardous air pollution, the city of Beijing matched that sum resulting in a whopping $19,000 subsidy for people who buy electric cars.”

That is a huge subsidy. Here in the United States, the government will give you a $7,500 tax subsidy for buying an electric car. Pollution in Beijing must be terrible.