Finally! An opportunity to get rid of roaming fees

Neelie Kroes unveils Net Neutrality plan for Europe, aims to end mobile roaming fees in 2014:

While travellers in Europe are enjoying lower roaming fees across the continent, the European Commission (EC) believes that isn’t enough. As part of new legislation, its vice president Neelie Kroes today unveiled new plans to end mobile roaming, and for the first time, guarantee net neutrality. Kroes’ legislative package is aimed at uniting European carriers, offering a single telecoms market by next year.

This news is most welcome. While it doesn’t help those in the US, a single European telecoms market is an extremely appealing prospect and the idea of a Europe without data roaming charges is mouthwatering. Add in to that the idea of a Europe-wide net neutrality law and this prospect gets even better. Hopefully Kroes reaches a good compromise with all involved and we’ll see this concept become reality.

Youth unemployment in Greece and Spain above 50 percent

Europe’s Record Youth Unemployment: The Scariest Graph in the World Just Got Scarier – Derek Thompson – The Atlantic:

My God, look at Greece’s trajectory. That thing isn’t slowing down. Since April 2012, Greek youth unemployment has grown by about one percentage point a month. At that rate, it would pass 70 percent in early 2014.

It is suddenly not insane to imagine a youth unemployment rate of 70 percent in the developed world. And that is insane.

Mind-boggling. I’d be rioting too.

Spaniards trust the police more than journalists

spanish police

The Christian Science Monitor:

It’s not just the expected result of citizens’ loss of institutional trust amid the grueling global economic crisis. Increased politicization and institutional weakness are making journalists easy prey to government and corporate pressure, experts say, leading to blatant cases of political and corporate manipulation and serious editorial mistakes in even the most reputable publications and broadcasters.

In fact, Spaniards trust journalists just a sliver more than lawyers, according to a poll released Feb. 20. Only 53 percent of Spaniards say journalists are honest, compared to 51 percent for lawyers, 80 percent for police, 88 percent for teachers, and more than 90 percent for health professionals. Bankers and members of parliament came in at 12 percent and 11 percent respectively.

[…]

To make things worse, media companies in Spain are either controlled by the government, or corporately owned by banks, large corporate tycoons, and even the Catholic Church. “From that point of view, [society] feels media companies lack independence of vested interests, and respond to ideological and economic clientlism.”

I spend a significant amount of time complaining about the state of journalism here in the US – yet, as this article shows, it could be a lot worse.