Barely anyone is pirating Arrested Development

Few People Are Pirating ‘Arrested Development’ Because Netflix Is Affordable Enough Already:

People love “Arrested Development” so much they’re actually willing to pay for it. Around 100,000 people illegally downloaded the show’s season 4 in the first 14 hours that it appeared on Netflix. Believe it or not, that number is nothing compared to the season premieres of other TV shows, and that likely has to do with the fact that “Arrested Development” was easily and inexpensively available online through the popular streaming-video service.

“Game Of Thrones,” HBO’s beloved fantasy drama, broke BitTorrent’s record with over 1 million downloads in the first 24 hours after the third season began airing in March.

Let people access your content at an affordable price and they’ll actually pay for it. Go figure.

You could go to jail for a year for sharing HBO Go passwords

Even New York Times Is Oblivious To Fact That Sharing ‘HBO Go’ Passwords To Watch ‘Game Of Thrones’ Breaks Law – Forbes:

It was left then to Mike Masnick at TechDirt to point out that Wortham had admitted to violating federal laws, including the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (or CFAA) which has been the target of heated debate given its use in the controversial prosecutions of AT&T iPad hacker Andrew “weev” Auernheimer and public document hacker Aaron Swartz. The CFAA makes it a crime “to obtain without authorization information from a protected computer.” It’s a misdemeanor with a maximum one-year prison sentence. What Wortham describes is unauthorized access, in that it violates the companies’ terms of service.

“[I]f someone is violating Netflix or HBO Go’s TOS to stream they are guilty of a misdemeanor CFAA right off the bat,” says Hanni Fakhoury of the EFF. And if the worth of the stolen information or damage caused in its procurement reaches $5,000 (that’s a lot of HBO episodes!), it could be a felony with multiple potential years of prison time.

It’s awesome how media companies have paid lawmakers to make so many laws that go against common sense.

The rise of shared video streaming accounts

Streaming Sites and the Rise of Shared Accounts – NYTimes.com:

We were each going to use HBO Go, the network’s video Web site, to stream the show online — but not our own accounts. To gain access, one friend planned to use the login of the father of a childhood friend. Another would use his mother’s account. I had the information of a guy in New Jersey that I had once met in a Mexican restaurant.

Our behavior — sharing password information to HBO Go, Netflix, Hulu and other streaming sites and services — appears increasingly prevalent among Web-savvy people who don’t own televisions or subscribe to cable.

I use my a former dorm-floormate’s mother’s HBO Go account. I use my mom’s Netflix account. My friends use my Amazon Prime subscription. From Jenna’s article (and a high-ranking source of my own at the MPAA), it sounds like these companies prefer having many people share subscriptions over having no subscribers at all – and thus don’t plan on cracking down on this behavior. I think it’s a fair middle ground between stopping piracy and providing a decent customer experience. 

Ted Sarandos’s strategy for getting the top talent in Hollywood to make shows for Netflix

kevin spacey house of cards netflix

Reed Hastings on Arrested Development, House of Cards, and the Future of Netflix: Movies + TV: GQ:

“The goal,” he says, “is to become HBO faster than HBO can become us.” His seductive pitch to today’s new breed of TV auteurs: a huge audience, real money, no meddlesome executives (“I’m not going to give David Fincher notes”), no pilots (television’s great sucking hole of money and hope), and a full-season commitment.

How to woo talent: give them the money and freedom to make excellent content.