Forbes writer travels in time from 2011, invents Surface

Intel Haswell Dramatically Strengthens The ‘2 In 1’ Device Argument – Forbes:

At 7 watts SDP, this could enable a tablet, detachable, or convertible with up to 8-10 hours of battery life with PC-like performance.  As a tablet, it would require a small fan and if it were a tablet would be a bit thicker than the iPad at 11-12mm, a bit heavier, and more expensive.  The trade-off is you get PC performance and features. Consider a convertible or detachable in this scenario.  You are basically getting the most powerful notebook at the thinnest dimensions with up to 8-10 hours battery life, always-on, always connected that can serve as a decent tablet under many circumstances.  All three of these form-factor scenarios are powerful, and I believe that this would sway many people to buy a new Haswell-based tablet, detachable or convertible. At this point you need to question just how many consumers will lay down $699 for your typically configured 10” iPad.

Wow: a tablet that:

  • has the power of a PC
  • needs a fan
  • is a bit thicker than an iPad
  • costs more than an iPad

I bet that would sell like hotcakes! Oh, wait:

According to the IDC, the Redmond company shipped 900,000 units of the Surface tablet. The unit figures equate to 1.8 percent of the first-quarter market share for 2013. The percentage presents both Surface with Windows RT and Surface with Windows 8 Pro tablets, however, IDC noted most of the shipments were of the latter.

Apple made Intel make better graphics chips

AnandTech | Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics Review: Core i7-4950HQ Tested:

Looking at the past few years of Apple products, you’ll recognize one common thread: Apple as a company values GPU performance. As a small customer of Intel’s, Apple’s GPU desires didn’t really matter, but as Apple grew, so did its influence within Intel. With every microprocessor generation, Intel talks to its major customers and uses their input to help shape the designs. There’s no sense in building silicon that no one wants to buy, so Intel engages its customers and rolls their feedback into silicon. Apple eventually got to the point where it was buying enough high-margin Intel silicon to influence Intel’s roadmap. That’s how we got Intel’s HD 3000. And that’s how we got here.

It’s amazing how Apple has influenced the tech industry over the last decade from the logistics side of things. Everyone knows (well, everyone but the most diehard Google fans) that the iPhone is what made Android go from this to this and that ultrabooks wouldn’t  be a thing without the MacBook Air.

How many people know that Intel decided to make chips actually capable of playing and editing high-definition video and playing PC games with decent frame rates because Apple made them to it?

CNET puts words in the mouth of Intel CEO, then hides it

CNET, yesterday:

Intel CEO Paul Otellini last week said touchscreen PCs could debut at prices as low as $200 in the coming months. At the time, he didn’t specify what operating system those products would run.

But Dadi Perlmutter, Intel executive vice president and chief product officer, told CNET on Wednesday that notebooks priced at the $200 level will predominantly be Android products running on Intel’s Atom mobile processor. Whether Windows 8 PCs hit that price largely depends on Microsoft, he said.

CNET last week, originally:

Windows 8 touch laptop prices are headed south. Way south, according to Intel executives.

The price of Windows 8 touch devices, including laptops, will sink to price points that penetrate inexpensive tablet territory. These new “innovative” designs will be based on Intel’s upcoming quad-core “Bay Trail” chip, Intel executives said today during the company’s first-quarter earnings conference call.

CNET last week, updated:

Touch laptop prices are headed south. Way south, according to Intel executives.

The price of Intel-based touch devices, including laptops, will sink to price points that penetrate inexpensive tablet territory. These new “innovative” designs will be based on Intel’s Atom chip, Intel executives said today during the company’s first-quarter earnings conference call.

CNET’s update note on that article:

Updated on April 19 at 1:05 p.m. PST: adds discussion about inexpensive Android devices. Updated throughout.

The editors at CNET did a pretty good job of covering up that fact that their writer basically quoted the CEO of Intel saying something he totally didn’t say.

Intel brags that next generation of Windows 8 devices will cost $200

Windows 8 touch devices to drop to $200, says Intel CEO | Business Tech – CNET News:

Windows 8 touch laptop prices are headed south. Way south, according to Intel executives.

The price of Windows 8 touch devices, including laptops, will sink to price points that penetrate inexpensive tablet territory. These new “innovative” designs will be based on Intel’s upcoming quad-core “Bay Trail” chip, Intel executives said today during the company’s first-quarter earnings conference call.

“If you look at touch-enabled Intel-based notebooks that are ultrathin using [Bay Trail] processors. Those prices are going to be down to as low as $200,” said Intel CEO Paul Otellini.

It would be awesome if Intel would stop spouting bullshit and deliver. Every quarter of every year, it’s “this new Atom processor is going to give you infinite battery life and super fast performance and hey look you can play Crysis on low at native resolution on this netbook!”

Enough already.

I’m going to go ahead and call this: if a device comes out this year running Windows 8 and it’s priced at $200 and it’s a notebook, no one will buy it. Why? Because no one wants a shitty plastic netbook anymore. If there were a market for netbooks, companies would be still making them. Which they aren’t. 

Plus, there’s no way that manufacturers could hit that $200 price point without compromising on literally everything – screen resolution, viewing angles, the amount of RAM, battery life, keyboard, all craptastic. Yet these companies act like the key to bringing back PC sales is more of this race to the bottom that has been going on  (outside of Apple) for the last two decade.