Penny Arcade’s Gabe on wearing Google Glass

His coverage of using Glass is nice, but his two paragraphs on what it’s like to wear Glass out in public really stood out to me:

Other than that, the biggest problem I have with Glass is wearing it around. I’ve tried to wear it out in public a few times and it’s incredibly strange. At first I thought I was just embarrassed to be wearing this goofy computer on my head but this morning I realised it’s more than that. Our current office is on the second floor of a larger building with multiple tenants. Downstairs is a daycare and when I arrive in the morning for work I see a lot of parents dropping their kids off. As I was walking in today I heard the front door open and I quickly slid my Glass down off my head and slung it around my neck. A woman passed me by and I gave her a polite smile. As I got inside the building I moved the Glass back up to my head but I realised the reason I took it off was because I didn’t want to be rude.

I was not embarrassed or worried she would think I was a dork. I AM a dork! What I was worried about was being rude. I feel like walking around with a camera pointed at people even if it’s not recording is just not polite. It’s a very strange feeling that I’m only just now trying to get my head around. I think the technology is incredibly cool but I wonder if socially we are ready for Glass. I’m starting to think the Google Glass Explorer program might be less about testing hardware, and more about testing people.

Gabe of Penny Arcade on the Surface Pro tablet

Microsoft surface pro

Penny Arcade:

As a mobile solution for a digital artist I’d say the Surface Pro is a winner. Now obviously if you need Photoshop you will probably want to wait until they get their driver issues worked out. If you’re a Sketchbook user (or you could be) then this thing is ready to go right now. I had some people on Twitter asking if the Surface Pro makes sense as an alternative to a Cintiq at home or the office. That one is harder for me to answer. I personally really like my Cintiq 24HD and I would not use the Surface pro at the office instead of it. With that said, if I had about a grand to spend and I was looking at a Cintiq, I’d say the Surface Pro is a much better purchase than the12WX Cintiq. The 64gb Surface Pro and the 12” Cintiq are about the same price but with the Surface, not only are you getting a fantastic drawing tablet that you can take with you wherever you go, it’s also a fucking computer!

This is probably the most positive thing that I’ve read about the Surface. It makes sense, really – he needs a tablet that lets him do digital artwork with the fewest hassles possible. The tech press is looking for a general purpose device that will replace their tablet/laptop (it doesn’t help that it’s priced somewhere in between what most people pay for those two kinds of devices).

As Gabe points out, for someone looking into buying a high-end drawing device like a Cintiq, the Surface Pro is a steal. After all, you also basically get a laplet/tabtop (because we need more stupid terms like phablet) thrown in for free.

The problem is that Microsoft is trying to sell this as a mainstream device like the MacBook Air or the iPad. At its current price point, I don’t think its compromises make it appealing to people looking to buy a device at either end of that spectrum.

Penny Arcade on the PlayStation 4

Penny Arcade – Augurism:

The bump to eight gigs of ram was clearly a recent addition, and there’s a lot of gesticulation toward the more “wibbly-wobbly” and “timey-wimey” aspects of the backend.  By the end, though, they showed a machine that was exquisitely tuned to this particular nanosecond.

Couldn’t have said it better myself. Wait, what?

Just kidding. Here’s what Tycho really thinks:

After absorbing the presentation, I feel confident in saying that the Wii U is the last of the traditional consoles, perhaps the last one ever.  Sony’s hour-long apology to publishers for the Playstation 3 (coupled with the leaked Durango specs) make this fairly clear.  Dedicated PCs with custom operating systems are the future, if not the present; it might be worth taking a moment to really let that soak in.

I agree completely. This is exactly why I don’t plan to buy another game console – with consoles becoming increasingly similar to PCs, I expect that we’ll see more major releases coming to PCs on day one. Also, screw spending another $400 bucks on a new console and $60 on games when already I have a badass XPS desktop ready to go and and a larger Steam backlog than I care to admit.