Metal Gear Rising Revengeance Coming to PC

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It looks like my personal favorite game of the year so far, Metal Gear Rising Revengeance, is coming to PC.

Via Joystiq:

Series creator Hideo Kojima announced Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance is coming to the PC. Speaking on his HideRadio podcast, Kojima revealed the upcoming port. The news was then confirmed by Platinum Games creative producer Jean Pierre Kellams.

In itself, this isn’t terribly amazing news. Revengeance did alright in terms of sales, but it’s hard to argue whether or not a Steam version of the game will reach a new audience that the console versions failed to tap into. Financially, this may just be about Platinum Games getting the most out of its development dollars.

On the other hand, porting the game to PC means 1080p visuals, plus whatever goodies modders will come up with. Revengeance is open ended in the way you cut apart your opponents, but when you start including possibilities like custom skins and levels and upgraded enemies and whatever silliness people with too much time on their hands can cook up, fans will likely be able to squeeze quite a bit more enjoyment out of the experience.

Platinum Games’ Tatsuya Minami on Company’s Future

Matt Leone posted a pretty interesting feature today over at Polygon that delves into the history of Platinum Games president Tatsuya Minami, as well as his expectations for the company’s future.

Originally a driving force behind many of Capcom’s biggest brands, Minami left the company to join with other former Capcom employees in what would eventually become Platinum Games. To date, they’ve released some of the most over the top, daring, and downright weird games of this console generation.

In the article, Minami outines the issues that his studio faces, including problems with overall sales and finding new opportunities for his team:

Minami says the biggest challenge running Platinum is finding new work for the team.

Asked to rate Platinum’s progress over the past five years, he gives the developers at the studio an A. “The team has been working really hard,” he says. “They’ve held up their end of the bargain and done a really good job of putting out really high-quality games.”

On the business side, he’s less enthusiastic. “Whether we’ve sold as well as we would have liked, or whether the company has the amount of money that everybody would love to have in the company, I think I’d probably rate it as a C or even a D.

What strikes me as amazing here is that what Minami wants to do isn’t anything we haven’t heard before. From EA to Activision, big publishers are always talking about their multiplatform strategies and global market plans. Maybe it’s the candidness and honesty behind his words, but his approach to his company’s problems seems a bit more genuine than we’re used to. Other studios say that their games underperformed; Minami praises his team for putting out high-quality games, regardless of sales.

It’s hard not to like the guy, and even harder not to root for him and his team.