“I was raped at Disney World and nobody cared”

Dana Wierzbicki was raped by a Disney World coworker after-hours. After figuring out the proper channels to go through to deal with the situation, she met with a counselor provided by the company. The (female!) counselor responded in pretty much the least helpful way imaginable:

I recounted everything that happened that night while the counselor stayed silent and seemed at least mildly sympathetic. When I told her we had been drinking, her face changed from “concerned” to “you made a mistake.”  Still, I told her, I said “no” the entire time and he never listened.  

The first thing she said to me was “Well, now you know not to be hanging around boys in the middle of the night. You know what they want.”

Take a few seconds and re-read that. Now let’s unpack it.

A certified counselor was insinuating that it was my fault that my coworker decided to rape me — as if I should have known better than to interact with any man after dark. Not only that, but she was advising me to approach every interaction with a man as if he is a potential rapist, including every man that works at Disney World. If I react to a man with anything less than hostility after sundown, whatever happens is my fault.

Georgia Senator attributes sexual assaults in the military to hormones

Saxby Chambliss Attributes Military Sexual Assault To ‘The Hormone Level Created By Nature’:

Sen. Saxby Chambliss (R-Ga.) called on the military to do more to crack down on sexual assault in its ranks on Tuesday, while also worrying that they may be hard to stop because of the natural “hormone level” of the young men serving.

“The young folks who are coming into each of your services are anywhere from 17 to 22 or 23. Gee whiz, the hormone level created by nature sets in place the possibility for these types of things to occur. So we’ve got to be very careful how we address it on our side,” Chambliss told top military officials at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing. “But guys, we are not doing our job. You’re not doing yours, and we are not doing ours with the rates we are seeing on sexual assaults.”

While he’s at least making the point that something should be done, “hormones” don’t explain why this kind of behavior is so disgustingly prevalent – a study by the Pentagon found that 26,000 service members were sexually assaulted last year alone.

What makes this possible is the perceived lack of repercussions for such behavior. And it’s no wonder they think they can get away with it: they can. Hell, just this April an Air Force pilot convicted of sexual assault had the decision overturned by a three-star general and is now reinstated. In an environment where there’s no punishment for acting like an animal, the worst of the young men in the military are doing just that.